When the Garda said we’d be out, we went out: Garney construction’s story

Garney Construction was building a residential development in the city centre of Galway when the gardaí were tipped off.

It was a big project for the city.

We knew from the outset that we were in for a big job and, although we had our work cut out, the work of construction is never done.

Garney Construction completed the project in January last year, when a court order granted permission for the project to proceed.

It was the first of several phases of the €7.2bn, 250-unit housing development.

Garney Constructions founder, Tom Garney, said the company had already completed a number of phases and the project had been completed in a cost-efficient manner.

Garneys work has been well documented.

The Irish Times ran an article on the project on November 11th, 2010, with a photo of a large garage that had been erected on the site.

The article quoted Mr Garney as saying: “The first phase of this project has gone so well that we’ve got to go back and do it again in 2019 or 2020.

We’ve just had the last of the work done and it’s a lot easier to start with.”

Garney Constructments website was updated on December 6th with the following:”The project has now been completed and the company has commenced work on the next phase of the project.

This phase will see the construction of 2,400 new residential units and a further 400 new commercial units.

The new units will be located in a newly constructed three-storey development in Co Dublin, with the remaining buildings in the existing two-storeys.”

Garneys previous work with the City of Galwegan was well documented in recent years, and it was widely reported at the time of the initial announcement of the development that it was being built to a ‘one-million-square-foot’ (m²) capacity.

The first phase was completed in 2011.

In a further statement, Garneys stated that it would be the first time that the company was working in Ireland.

However, the company’s previous work in Ireland has also been heavily scrutinised, with some locals calling for the development to be put back in the red.

In 2013, the local council in Galweghan called for Garneys work to be withdrawn, citing concerns that the site was unsuitable for housing, and that the scheme had “no relation” to the local heritage and heritage conservation area.

Mr Garney said that he was concerned about the safety of the contractors who had been involved in the project, and he said that they had done their job “well”.

“They’ve done a good job and I hope that it’s something that they can continue to do in the future,” he said.

Mr Tom Garneys son, Tom, added: “This project is an example of how the Gardai can get things done in the right way.

We’re not going to stop it and we’re not stopping this project.”

A spokesman for the Gardae said the Gardaic Unit Detachment had been informed of the latest developments and was liaising with Garney’s legal team.

“Garney is undertaking a comprehensive environmental impact assessment of the site and will provide updates on this in the coming days,” he added.