Blythe: I had to build it for my brother

Blyth, Idaho — In the weeks leading up to the start of the 2013-14 season, the Idaho men’s hockey team was in need of a new forward to lead the charge on the back end.

The club had been forced to part ways with former No. 1 draft pick Andrew Hammond, who signed with the Colorado Avalanche after the 2013 NHL Entry Draft.

But after the team acquired forward Mikey Laine, the need was apparent.

After missing out on the 2012 Stanley Cup Final, Blythan’s prospects were bright.

But with a full season under his belt in junior, it was clear the 23-year-old wasn’t ready to take the next step on the ice.

Blythe, a 6-foot-3, 190-pound native of Blytha, Idaho, was the ideal forward to help fill the void, according to head coach Mike Smith.

The Idaho native scored seven goals and added nine assists in his first full season in the NHL.

Bylthe had seven goals, six assists and a plus-nine rating in the 2013 AHL playoffs and finished second on the team in goals (24), assists (21) and points (28).

The 6-2, 215-pound forward is the first of two selections by the Coyotes to be a member of the NHL team.

The Coyotes selected defenseman Mike Smith (8th round, 2014) with the sixth overall pick in the 2014 NHL Draft.

Smith, who was named the Coyotes’ captain this year, is expected to compete for a roster spot next season.

He was originally selected in the fourth round, 116th overall by the New York Islanders in 2013.

Bryant, Texas — The Texas Stars got their first look at Bryant, a 20-year old center, on Thursday in an exhibition game.

The 6-4, 200-pound center is from Arlington, Texas.

Byrant, who attended North Texas College, played two seasons at the University of New Hampshire before transferring to Texas A&M University.

He played for the Huskies and scored 13 goals and 25 points in 61 games.

How to make an excuse for yourself when your boss isn’t paying you

The internet is full of excuses for why you should not get paid, and Google’s latest has to do with how the company treats its employees.

The company’s Chief Legal Officer said in a statement that the company’s “employees are not entitled to a minimum wage of $15 per hour” despite the fact that the majority of its employees make less than that.

The statement added that employees should be paid $20 an hour for “any work performed that requires the use of a mobile device, such as reading, writing, or browsing the web.”

The CEO of an online retailer told the New York Times that Google had been “disgusting” and “screwed up” in recent weeks.

“We can’t pay the people who have been making $10-$15 an hour, but they’re making a lot of money and we don’t care,” the CEO said.

A spokesman for Google did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

How to make an excuse for yourself when your boss isn’t paying you

The internet is full of excuses for why you should not get paid, and Google’s latest has to do with how the company treats its employees.

The company’s Chief Legal Officer said in a statement that the company’s “employees are not entitled to a minimum wage of $15 per hour” despite the fact that the majority of its employees make less than that.

The statement added that employees should be paid $20 an hour for “any work performed that requires the use of a mobile device, such as reading, writing, or browsing the web.”

The CEO of an online retailer told the New York Times that Google had been “disgusting” and “screwed up” in recent weeks.

“We can’t pay the people who have been making $10-$15 an hour, but they’re making a lot of money and we don’t care,” the CEO said.

A spokesman for Google did not immediately respond to a request for comment.