‘This is not my first rodeo’: The history of Suffolk’s coal industry

A new study by Suffolk University says the coal industry is in trouble, and there’s a growing sense that the state needs to step in and help.

Suffolk University’s Center for Coal Research is studying the state’s coal sector, including its economic impacts, coal mine closures, and what the state could do to help coal miners get back on their feet.

The center, which is funded by the Rockefeller Foundation, has studied the industry since 2011, looking at its health, its environmental impacts, its effects on the economy, and how the state has responded to the industry’s decline.

The report focuses on the coal mines of Suffolk, New Hampshire, which employ more than 7,000 people and employ nearly 6,000 of them in the state.

Seward Coal, one of the largest mining companies in the country, announced in February that it would be closing the town of Sullivans, one mile from the town’s main railroad station.

The company said it had not been able to secure the necessary permits to continue operations there.

The mine closed in August and workers said they had not received any paychecks for months.

Sunderland Coal Co. closed its plant in Sullavans in February 2018 and said that it was planning to open a mine at another site in the town, but no mining license was granted for that mine.

Coalminers are still struggling to find a new coal mine in the area, which they have mined for nearly a century.

The coal industry, which employs more than 70,000 workers and employs more in New Hampshire than anywhere else in the U.S., has been in the spotlight over the past several years because of the coal mining closures.

A series of lawsuits have been filed over the last two years by coal miners in Suffolk.

The coal industry has been struggling for decades to find the right permits to operate, and the state legislature recently passed legislation that requires that the mines must obtain permits for new mine projects.